City of Detroit safely opens recreation centers to provide relief from extreme heat and protection against COVID-19

  • Five recreation centers to provide air-conditioned comfort, protection from extreme temperatures
  • Cooling centers to operate today through Thursday, Noon to 8:00 p.m.
  • Residents required to wear a mask or face covering and observe physical distancing and more to protect against COVID-19

 

According to the National Weather Service, temperatures are expected to exceed 90 degrees this week in the Detroit area. To provide relief from extreme temperatures, the City has expanded the use of five recreation centers, currently open for food distribution, to also serve as cooling centers for residents.

Residents will be required to wear a mask or face covering and observe physical distancing requirements. To further ensure safety from the Coronavirus, staff will conduct pre-screening questions and temperature checks. High-touch areas and restrooms will be disinfected every two hours, and maximum capacity limits at each site have been lowered. PPE and bottled water will also be provided.

Cooling centers will operate today through Thursday, Noon to 8:00 p.m. The following is a list of Detroit recreation centers serving as cooling centers for residents this summer:

Residents will be required to wear a mask or face covering and observe physical distancing requirements. To further ensure safety from the COVID-19, staff will conduct pre-screening questions and temperature checks. High-touch areas and restrooms will be disinfected every two hours, and maximum capacity limits at each site have been lowered. PPE and bottled water will also be provided.

During periods of extreme heat, the Detroit Health Department recommends that residents:

  • Drink plenty of water, and avoid alcohol and caffeine.
  • Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Reduce outdoor activities and stay inside in air-conditioned locations.
  • Never leave children, seniors, or pets alone in closed vehicles—even for short periods of time.
  • The temperature inside the car can become 30–40 degrees hotter than the outside temperature.
  • Check on family and neighbors who are older, sick, or with special needs that may need help responding to the heat.
  • Watch out for signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke, which include: confusion; hot, dry, flushed skin; cool and clammy skin; lightheadedness; headache; dizziness; and nausea. Call 911 immediately if any of these symptoms occur.
  • Choose loose fitting, lightweight clothing, and opt for light-colored fabric, as it reflects heat. Avoid wearing black clothes, especially if you’re in direct sunlight. Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses and sunscreen.
  • If you must work outside, take frequent breaks and drink plenty of water.
  • PETS: To avoid heat-related illnesses in your pet, make sure they have protection from the sun and cool drinking water. Avoid leaving them outside during excessively hot and humid days, and monitor them regularly.

“Cooling centers are an important resource to residents during extreme heat, which is why we worked closely with the recreation department to ensure they operate safely with COVID-19 safety protocols in place,” says Chief Public Health Officer Denise Fair, Detroit Health Department. “It's important that seniors, those with health challenges and even pets stay cool and hydrated throughout the summer months to protect against heat-related illness.”

More tips for staying cool in extreme hot temperatures can be found at www.detroitmi.gov/health